2012-12-03

Authors in a Markov matrix: Which author do people find most inspiring? (9)


As an example, let's ask Alice to join us.
Figure 8 (a) shows a node representing Alice. There are no edge in this figure, which means that Alice doesn't like herself. Figure 8 (b) has an edge from Alice to Alice, so now Alice likes Alice (herself).
Figure 8: Graphs representing the relationship between Alice and herself.
The adjacency matrix of the graph shown in Figure 8 (a) is the following. This is the case in which Alice doesn't like herself:
\begin{eqnarray*} \begin{array}{cc} & \mbox{Alice}\\ \mbox{Alice} & \left[ \begin{array}{c} 0\\ \end{array} \right] \\ \end{array} \end{eqnarray*} For the case in which Alice likes herself (as shown in Figure 8 (b)), the adjacency matrix is the following:
\begin{eqnarray*} \begin{array}{cc} & \mbox{Alice}\\ \mbox{Alice} & \left[ \begin{array}{cc} 1 \\ \end{array} \right] \\ \end{array} \end{eqnarray*}
This time, there is only Alice. This is the simplest relationships. Next time, we will see a bit more complicated relationships.

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